An old fogy's website
The dinosaur lives! Just me trying to buck the trendy 'websites for dummies' style

©2012 Jerry DePyper
About the Book

The short novel Hickies is set in the near future and deals with a futuristic theme: that human clones will likely soon be living among us; what might that be like? But this story is not of the true Science Fiction genre, nor does it rely upon high-tech or sci-fi devices. Its context is everyday life, the weird and bizarre occuring within commonplace lives of ordinary people. The futuristic events serve mainly to raise deep and timeless questions, pondered by philosophers and theologians of centuries past. As a result, there is a decidedly religious, even sectarian flavor to the story line, and it is classified as belonging to the Psychological / Philosophical genre.

Perhaps vainly, the author likes to think of this work as modelled roughly upon Stephen Crane's The Red Badge of Courage, both in its relative brevity and in the way it uses a field of high drama to explore the inner workings of the human soul, albeit with a style quite distinct from Crane's.

Included in the same volume with Hickies are four short stories, all by the same author. Like Hickies, these stories are classified as Psychological / Philosophical since they likewise explore what it means to be human, using different writing techniques and themes. The four short stories are as follows:

  • A Close Encounter Remembered is a fictional account of one man's close encounter with extraterrestrials, and what they taught him about the human race.
  • The young couple in Improbable Parable makes a surprising discovery in the wooded wilderness of mid-continent Canada. The question is: Can you interpret the hidden analogy?
  • In the middle of fifth grade, Scotty Parson's family moves to a different town, making him the New Kid at Our Lady of Mercy School.
  • Walking Home is a subsequent chapter in the life of young Scotty Parson.
About the Author

Born Dec. 27, 1950 the fifth child of a farm family in southwestern Minnesota, Jerry DePyper grew up and spent most of his life in the upper midwest of the United States. In his youth he tasted life inside a religious community, in a seminary, and on the road as a vagabond. Mostly, however, Jerry has been a working man, earning his living through a number of trades, including that of mechanical draftsman, roofing contractor, social worker, computer programmer, house remodeler, and organic vegetable gardener. He married Lenore in 1984, divorced in 1999 (no children), and maintains a close friendship with her, although many miles apart.

He is known by his friends and family as a bit of an oddball, one significant reason being his unusual stance on tax resistance. To Jerry, it is a simple if difficult equation: U.S. taxes pay for elective abortions, embryonic stem cell research, funding for Planned Parenthood, and related moral deal-breakers. Therefore, as a matter of conscience and in emulation of anti-war tax resisters, pro-lifers ought not to voluntarily cooperate in such tax tyranny. Jerry first tried to follow this principle in H.D. Thoreau fashion, and lived for 11+ years below the tax radar, growing his own food, chopping his own wood for fuel, etc. Seeking like-minded folks, he launched a pro-life tax strike web site which met with very little response. Subsequently, he decided to flee the country and has been living in Nicaragua ever since, where he has begun trying his hand at writing and website development, and trying also to learn Spanish.


To order Hickies directly from CreateSpace, the on-demand publisher, you may click above on the book's image, or navigate to . On that page, enter discount code N2A6HDHG for a $3.00 discount off each copy of Hickies that you order there.

Please visit Jerry's profile page on as well, to review and order the book through Amazon and/or to offer an Amazon book review. You may also review Hickies and a few other books by Jerry on the CyberJerry 'Books' page. That page also provides links to the CreateSpace and Amazon sites.

   rev. 2017.11.26